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Canal Information
Aquatic Vegetation Found in Village Canals
The aquatic plants identified below are not the only plants that we have in our system but are the four (4) primary plants of concern that are currently being treated for in our system.  The identified plants are aggressive and if left unchecked can takeover the area of the canal that they are growing in.

  • Hygrophila:
Hygrophila is a fast-growing and fast-spreading invasive that can outshade and therefore outcompete other submersed plants; it can occupy the entire water column; many adventitious roots at stem nodes means that fragments can easily grow.  It was brought to the U.S. as an aquarium plant about 1945 and was first reported as a weed problem in south Florida canals in 1980.  We first began to notice and treat for this invasive plant in the Village’s canals in 2006.  At present, this invasive plant can be found throughout the Village’s canal system.  You can find more information concerning Hygrophila at the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants at the University of Florida, IFAS Extension, http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/191.

  • Cabomba (Fanwort):
Cabomba is a native plant to Florida but is also found in the aquarium industry.  The plant grows in 3-10 feet of water and is recognizeable from the ½” white to pink flowers that are visible on the surface of the water.  The flowers grow on stalks that arise from the tips of the stems of the submersed plant.  If left unchecked, Cabomba can and will take over the area of the water that it is growing in.  We first identified Cabomba in the Village’s canals in the summer of 2012 primarily in the areas adjacent to the M-1 Canal.  The plant can now be found in many areas of the Village’s canal system.  You can find more information concerning Cabomba at the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants at the University of Florida, IFAS Extension, http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/76.

  • Rotala:
Rotala is a popular ornamental plant in the international aquarium industry.  It is a creeping aquatic perennial with soft, dark pink stems that branch often to form low, creeping clumps.  Rotala grows about 4 to 5 inches per week and can quickly shades out other aquatic vegetation.   We first identified Rotala in the Village system canals in the summer of 2012 primarily in the Crestwood area west of Crestwood Boulevard.  The plant can now be found in many areas of the Village’s canal system.  You can find more information concerning Rotala at the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants at the University of Florida, IFAS Extension, http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/664. Additionally, the UF/IFAS Extension has recently posted a new publication titled, “Rotala: A New Aquatic Invader in Southern Florida”, which can be found at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag381.
 
  • Chara (Muskgrass):
Chara is a native to Florida.  Chara looks like a higher order aquatic plant, but is actually a multi-cellular macro-alga.  It grows attached to the bottoms of ponds, lakes, slow-moving rivers, canals and ditches and will sometimes form an underwater meadow.  We first identified Chara in the Village system during this current growing season (Summer 2013).  The plant can now be found in many areas of the Village’s canal system.  You can find more information concerning Chara at the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants at the University of Florida, IFAS Extension, http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/98.

Fertilizer Ordinance
The Village of Royal Palm Beach has adopted a “Fertilizer Friendly-Use Ordinance”. The purpose of the ordinance is to enhance water quality in our local water bodies. The ordinance requires the use of Best Management Practices (BMP’s) for fertilizer application and vegetative debris management and specifies allowable application rates and methods. By following the requirements of this ordinance, we can minimize the amount of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) that are in our stormwater runoff which goes into our canals and feeds the aquatic vegetation that is growing in the canal.

Links:
December 1, 2011 presentation to Council: Fertilizer Ordinance for Urban Landscapes
Village of Royal Palm Beach Fertilizer Friendly-Use Ordinance

To learn more about fertilizer use and other stormwater related issues, please visit the Palm Beach County MS4 NPDES program website at www.pbco-npdes.org

Canal System Status
The following is the presentation made to Council on the condition of the canal system. This status update was presented to Council on October 3, 2013 and represented the condition of the canals at the end of September 2013. We will be providing bi-monthly updates to Council and will post the information here.

Canal System Status Update - Presentation to Council - 10/16/2014
Canal System Status Update - Presentation to Council - 04/16/2015

Stormwater and Me
Many of you may ask, what does stormwater runoff have to do with me?  Much of the pollutants that end up in our canals and other water bodies comes from us!  Whether it is from litter, throwing things in a storm drain, or over fertilizing, these activities result in personal pollution that we can all help to prevent!!

For more information on stormwater runoff, pollution and what you can do to help, visit the Stormwater and Me website.

To Report An Issue
If an issue with Village waterways needs to be reported, please contact the Public Works Department at (561) 790-5122.

You may also enter a request online using our 
Citizen Support Center and selecting either Vegetation - Aquatic or Waterways as the subject of your request.



1050 Royal Palm Beach Blvd.
Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411
Ph: (561) 790-5100
Fx: (561) 790-5174
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